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2002-2008 Events

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Early Fall 2008

Joint CS/GRAND Seminar: Computer Science and Video Games: Teaching and Research in Higher Education

Thursday, November 13, 2008,
12:00 PM,
ST 2, Room 430A
Graham Morgan

Visiting Professor
Department of Computer Science
George Mason University

Abstract

This talk will be on how links with the video games industry can strengthen research and teaching in universities. Considering the market worth of commercial video games one may be surprised to find that collaboration between academics and their industrial counterparts in the games industry is not common. Consequently, computer science graduates tend not to satisfy game industry programming requirements and gaming studios rarely interact with universities. To overcome such a scenario requires time and effort, but the rewards of collaboration between the video games industry and universities can be significant in terms of student teaching and research initiatives.

Speaker Bio

Graham Morgan gained his PhD in the area of distributed systems and continues to work in this area, creating tools and techniques to ease the development of highly available Internet applications. Over the past few years the video games industry presented a series of case studies which Graham used to highlight his distributed systems work. Working with the games industry in the UK, Graham has created a number of university level courses and programs to help ensure students are sufficiently qualified to succeed in the video game industry.

Joint Volgenau School/CS Seminar: Performance Engineering in Secure Distributed Systems

Friday, November 14, 2008,
3:00 PM,
Johnson Center, Gold Room (Lower Level)
Sanjeev Setia

Associate Professor
Department of Computer Science
George Mason University

Abstract

Over the last 10 years, my research has focused on issues in performance engineering of secure distributed systems. In this talk, I will provide an overview of my research, while discussing some selected contributions in greater detail. Specifically, I will discuss my research on supporting secure communication in both wide-area networks as well as emerging networks such as mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) and wireless sensor networks. I will also describe a recent project on reliable bulk data dissemination in sensor networks, and discuss future research directions.

Speaker Bio

Sanjeev Setia is an Associate Professor in the Computer Science Department at George Mason University. He received his PhD from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1993. His research interests are in ad hoc and sensor networks, network security and performance evaluation of computer systems. In recent years, he has worked extensively on security mechanisms and protocols for ad hoc and sensor networks. He was the founder of the ACM Workshop on Security in Ad hoc and Sensor Networks (SASN) and served as its co-organizer 2003 and 2004. His research has been funded by NSF, NASA and DARPA.

PhD Dissertation Defense: Secure Data Aggregation in Wireless Sensor Networks

Friday, November 14, 2008,
10:00AM - Noon,
Research 1, Room 401
Sankardas Roy

Mtech, Computer Science, Indian Statistical Institute

Abstract

Wireless sensor networks have proved to be useful in several applications, such as environment monitoring and perimeter surveillance. In a large sensor network, in-network data aggregation (i.e., combining partial results at intermediate nodes during message routing) significantly reduces the amount of communication and energy consumption. Recently, the research community has proposed a robust aggregation framework called synopsis diffusion which combines multi-path routing schemes with duplicate-insensitive algorithms to accurately compute aggregates (e.g., Count, Sum) in spite of message losses resulting from node and transmission failures. However, this aggregation framework does not address the problem of false sub-aggregate values contributed by compromised nodes resulting in large errors in the aggregate computed at the base station, which is the root node in the aggregation hierarchy. This is an important problem since sensor networks are highly vulnerable to node compromises due to the unattended nature of sensor nodes and the lack of tamper-resistant hardware.

In this thesis, we make the synopsis diffusion approach secure against attacks in which compromised nodes contribute false sub-aggregate values. In particular, we present two classes of algorithms to securely compute Count or Sum. First, we propose a lightweight verification algorithm which enables the base station to determine if the computed aggregate includes any false contribution. Second, we present attack-resilient computation algorithms which can be used to compute the true aggregate by filtering out the contributions of compromised nodes in the aggregation hierarchy. Thorough theoretical analysis and extensive simulation study show that our algorithms outperform other existing approaches.

This thesis also addresses the security issues of in-network computation of Median, and presents verification algorithms and attack-resilient computation algorithms to securely compute an approximate estimate of this aggregate. To the best of our knowledge, prior to this dissertation there was no other work related to the security of in-network computation of Median. We evaluate the performance and cost of our algorithms via both analysis and simulation. The results show that our approach is scalable and efficient.

Dissertation directors: Dr. Sushil Jajodia and Dr. Sanjeev Setia

Security Seminar: Physical Security Controls and Weaknesses

Tuesday, November 18, 2008,
6:15 PM to 9:00 PM,
Student Union I, Room B
Deviant Ollam

Abstract

Physical security is an oft-overlooked component of data and system security in the technology world. While frequently forgotten, it is no less critical than timely patches, appropriate password policies, and proper user permissions. You can have the most hardened servers and network but that doesn't make the slightest difference if someone can gain direct access to a keyboard or, worse yet, march your hardware right out the door. Those who attend this session will leave with a full awareness of how to best protect buildings and grounds from unauthorized access. Discussion as well as direct example will be used to demonstrate the grave failings of low-grade hardware... much of which will be opened by audience members with no prior training. What features to look for in locks and safes will be covered, and how to invest in systems that are easiest to manage in large environments will be discussed.

PhD Dissertation Defense: Virtual Human Anatomy and Surgery Systems

Tuesday, November 18, 2008,
10:00AM - Noon,
Science and Tech 2 Building, Room 430A
Yanling Liu

BS in Computer Science, 1998
MS in Communication Engineering, 2001

Abstract

Historically, medical students have practiced on cadavers to learn human anatomy, as have physicians wanting to brush up on their knowledge. However, because of storage cost and limited availability of cadavers, practice on cadavers has proven problematic. As computers become more powerful, medical professors have dreamed of a day when they will be able to dissect bodies with the assistance of virtual reality. We have developed the Virtual Human Anatomy and Surgery System (VHASS) as a potential solution. VHASS uses cryosection images (natural-color images generated by slicing a frozen cadaver) to reconstruct computerized three-dimensional cadavers. VHASS enhances human anatomy education by creating three-dimensional volume models that include details of human organs, giving medical students and physicians unlimited access to realistic virtual cadavers. Major components in VHASS include three-dimensional virtual humans, direct volume rendering of virtual humans, surface models of segmented human parts, and real-time manipulation on virtual humans.

Direct volume rendering on un-segmented cryosection images is still an open research topic. Different from traditional volume rendering, which uses transfer functions to map scalar values to colors and opacity, direct volume rendering on cryosection images needs efficient transfer functions mapping vectors to opacity, which is complicated by the non-linearity of color space. We have created a series of new transfer functions for volume rendering on un-segmented cryosection images.

To create human part surface models, we separate human tissues within cryosection images, dissect all human organs according to their anatomic structures, and reconstruct a three-dimensional volume model for each part. VHASS renders each part as a high-resolution, natural-appearance three-dimensional model and labels it properly to facilitate learning. This enables users to group different parts to better understand human anatomy.

VHASS allows real-time interactions, such as drilling, scanning and slicing on human parts. We re-generate human part surface models at run-time for deforming interactions. We have analyzed the limitation of the well-known Marching Cubes algorithm and modified the algorithm to work with our data. We also have developed a new neighbor-based surface reconstruction algorithm, which has the same performance as the Marching Cubes algorithm but without the limitation of the Marching Cubes method. For better performance, the new algorithm has been ported onto the new graphics hardware using the geometry shader. Our implementation on the geometry shader serves as an example of exploiting the new GPU parallel processing hardware.

VHASS supports stereo rendering, haptic interaction, tracking and three-dimensional content production. Using the Sharp three-dimensional display on a laptop, VHASS provides low-cost, portable stereo rendering of human parts without the requirement of special glasses. Integrating with large size stereo projector and ultrasonic trackers, VHASS allows people to manipulate human parts in the immersive stereo environment. By integrating SensAble Onmi haptic device, VHASS enables people to feel the touch on human parts. VHASS integrates three-dimensional content creation by allowing students to print out physical models of human parts.

Dissertation director: Dr. Jim X. Chen

CS Seminar: Analysis and modelling of complex biological systems

Wednesday, November 19, 2008,
1:00 PM,
Science & Tech II 430A
Peter Andras

Reader, School of Computing Science, New Castle University, UK

Abstract

Biological systems are very complex and present a great variety of scientific challenges. Is it really possible to find novel drug targets by analysing protein interaction networks of bacteria and their hosts? Can we understand how and why selfish individuals share their precious resources with others and cooperate regularly? How do neural systems work to generate wide ranges of complex behaviours in animals? This talk will present results that indicate some answers to these question. First, we show how network analysis methods can be used to identify structural integrity vulnerabilities in protein interaction networks that correspond to actual and potential antibiotic targets. Second, we discuss agent-based simulations to analyse the role of uncertainty in the evolution of cooperative behaviour. Third, we present results of high spatio-temporal resolution optical imaging of the crab stomatogastric ganglion (STG) using voltage-sensitive dyes. This technique allows simulatenous recording of many (possibly all) neurons in this small neural system (26 neurons) which generates many muscle driving rhythms. This makes possible to analyse at single neuron resolution details the interactions of many neurons and can help revealing of how this relatively simple but still complex neural system works.

Bio

Dr Peter Andras studied computer science (BSc, 1995), artificial intelligence (MSc, 1996), and mathematical analysis of neural networks (PhD, 2000) at the Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj, Romania. He worked in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Maastricht (Netherlands, 1998-2000) and the Department of Psychology of the Newcastle University (UK, 2000-2002) before joining as Lecturer (Assistant Professor) the School of Computing Science of the Newcastle University in 2002. In 2005 he was promoted to the rank of Reader (Associate Professor).

His research interests are in the area of information processing in complex systems. His work includes analysis of protein interaction systems, analysis and modelling of neural systems, network analysis of organisations, and applications of network analysis and computational intelligence methods in a range of areas (e.g. ecosystem analysis, financial predictions, etc).

He has one patent, and published two books, and over 70 scientific papers in journals, edited volumes, and conference proceedings. He is on the editorial boards of two scientific journals, participated in the organisation of many international conferences (e.g. recent ICANN, IJCNN conferences), and has been member of the Executive Board of the European Neural Network Society (2004-2007).

His work contributed to the formation of a university spin-out company in the area of computational biology and drug development (the company has been introduced to the stock exchange in November 2007). He is currently working on the formation of another spin-off company in the area of e-commerce.

GRAND/SANG Seminar: AITVS: Advanced Interactive Traffic Visualization System

Friday, November 21, 2008,
3:00 PM,
430A S&T II
Chang-Tien Lu

Associate Professor, Department of Computer Science, Virginia Tech

Abstract

The explosive growth of spatial data obtained by government agencies and research institutes has created a need for next generation spatial analysis tools that can automatically transform the collected data into useful information and knowledge. Spatial data mining is concerned with the discovery of interesting and useful but implicit knowledge from spatial data. Visualization is the process of visually exploring data for identifying patterns and trends. Visualization and mining techniques allow organizations and companies to extract practical information from the vast amount of data they have gathered, thus helping them make effective decisions.

We have developed the Advanced Interactive Traffic Visualization System (AITVS), a web-based visualization system, for observing and analyzing the summarization of spatiotemporal patterns in transportation data. Existing transportation visualization systems exhibit some useful but limited tools for in-depth exploration, and do not provide the critical instruments for comprehensive study. AITVS mitigates the shortcomings of existing systems by provides a rich set of multidimensional visual components for real-time and historical traffic data analyses. In addition, through the combination of advanced optimization techniques and the delegation of visual data processing, AITVS can achieve the quick response times of 1-5 seconds for complex queries. The discovered traffic patterns and rules from AITVS can assist decision-making for transportation managers, establish traffic models for researchers and planners, and allow commuters to select optimal commuting routes. The traffic data of I-66 and I-95 in Metropolitan Washington region are used to demonstrate the concepts.

Bio

Dr. Chang-Tien Lu is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He received an M.S. degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Minnesota. He served as Program Chair for the 2006 IEEE International Conference on Tools with Artificial Intelligence and the 2007 IEEE International Workshop on Spatial and Spatial-temporal Data Mining. Dr. Lu's research work focuses on emerging requirements for storing, analyzing, exchanging, visualizing, and disseminating spatial (and spatio-temporal) data in geospatial applications. His research group has developed several web-based spatial analysis and visualization systems for managing and mining various kinds of spatial information. Specific projects include discovering spatial anomalies, identifying recurrent or unexpected events, and predicting future trends. His research projects have been sponsored by the Department of Defense, the Virginia Department of Transportation, and the Virginia Transportation Research Council.

PhD Dissertation Defense: Learning of Mixed-Initiative Human-Computer Interaction Models

Tuesday, December 02, 2008,
10:00am,
Research I, Room 401
Dorin Marcu

Abstract

Mixed-initiative interaction facilitates a collaboration between intelligent agents and their users that takes advantage of their complementary capabilities by supporting each of them in taking the initiative to perform the tasks for which they are most qualified, at the appropriate time.

This thesis presents a learning-based approach to the development of mixed-initiative interaction models that govern the interaction between an end-user and a multi-agent system consisting of a collection of knowledge-based assistants specialized in helping the user perform different tasks. In general, developing such interaction models is a software engineering task of programming complex interfaces. Our approach transforms this software engineering task into a knowledge engineering one of representing the interaction models into a knowledge base. Moreover, the knowledge engineer does not need to manually define the reasoning rules that govern the user-agent interactions. Instead, the knowledge engineer teaches the agent how to interact with the user based on specific interaction scenarios from which the agent learns general interaction rules. This learning ability allows the agent to also adapt to the changing needs and preferences of the user.

At the basis of our approach is a task analysis methodology that results in the learning of executable interaction models by the mixed-initiative assistants. It includes general methods and guidelines for translating conceptual interaction plans into interaction models executable by a state-based interaction engine, the conceptualization of the interactions into an interaction ontology, and the adaptation and application of methods for learning general problem solving rules to the learning of general interaction patterns.

The task analysis methodology is supported by a general architecture for the mixed-initiative interaction of a multi-agent system. We have developed two assistants in this architecture, the Assumption Assistant and the Modeling Assistant, each with its own interaction model. The Assumption Assistant helps its user to solve problems in application domains with incomplete or uncertain information, by facilitating the definition of hypothetical solutions to the unsolved sub-problems. The Modeling Assistant helps a user to extend the partial reasoning tree generated by an agent by suggesting plausible ways to reduce unsolved problems.

The mixed-initiative interaction framework developed and its associated methods have been implemented as an extension of the Disciple learning agent shell. This shell allows subject matter expert to teach an agent how to solve problems in an application domain. Our mixed-initiative methods allow a knowledge engineer (and the expert) to teach the agent how to more efficiently interact during the problem solving process.

Non-Degree Open House

Wednesday, December 03, 2008,
6:00 PM to 8:30 PM,
Research I Building Room 163

Abstract

The Volgenau School of IT & Engineering offers non-degree students the opportunity to learn about graduate programs and apply as a non-degree student. Admissions decisions are guaranteed within 5 business days for attendees who complete their applications at the event.

Eligibility Disclaimer:

US Citizens, Permanent Residents, and individuals with H or A visas are eligible for non-degree studies. Individuals seeking or holding F1 or J1 visas are not eligible for non-degree status, but may apply for any of our degree programs.

A presentation will be given, light refreshments will be served, and you will have an opportunity to meet with Computer Science Department faculty who will answer your questions.

Please RSVP at: http://volgenau.ite.gmu.edu/graduateresearch/responseform/

Directions/Map: http://coyote.gmu.edu/map

Parking: http://www.gmu.edu/univserv/parking/visitors

For complete details of the event: http://volgenau.ite.gmu.edu/graduates/non_degree_open_house.php

SANG Seminar: Bluetooth Security: Overview, Analysis, and Research Opportunities

Friday, December 05, 2008,
3:00 PM,
S&T II 430A
John Padgette

Associate, Booz Allen Hamilton

Abstract

Bluetooth is one of the most widely available wireless technologies with over 1.5 billion Bluetooth-enabled devices shipped. Used by cell phones, laptops, gaming consoles and many other devices, it is the predominant wireless personal area networking technology.

With the publication of the Bluetooth 2.1 specification in July 2007, a number of security enhancements were introduced by the Bluetooth Special Interest Group (SIG) that are designed to make Bluetooth products more secure yet easier to use. However, there are still residual security issues that need to be researched.

This presentation will provide a technical background on how Bluetooth works, and then dive into the inner workings of the native security mechanisms - including new v2.1 features such as Secure Simple Pairing and Security Mode 4. This will culminate in a discussion of interesting Bluetooth security research opportunities.

Speaker's Bio

John Padgette, an Associate with Booz Allen Hamilton, has over 17 years of Information Technology experience and has spent the last 5 years focused on wireless security challenges. His Bluetooth experience includes in-depth link security analysis of Bluetooth-enabled smart card readers and headsets for use with handheld devices and PCs.

John is co-author of the NIST Special Publication 800-121 Guide to Bluetooth Security as well as a contributor to the DoD Security Requirements for Bluetooth-enabled Smart Card Readers and Headsets. He is also currently Co-Chair of the Bluetooth SIG's Security Experts Group.

John holds Master's degrees in Computer Science and Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. He is currently pursuing a PhD in Information Security at George Mason University. John also holds several professional certifications including CISSP, CWSP, CWNA, and CCNA.

PhD Defense: Virtual Human Anatomy and Surgery System
Tuesday 10:00AM, November 18, 2008, ST 2, Room 430A
Yanling Liu
Director: Prof. Jim X. Chen
PhD Defense: Secure Data Aggregation in Wireless Sensor Networks
Friday 10:00AM, November 14, 2008, Research 1 Room 401
Sankardas Roy
Directors: Profs. Sushil Jajodia and Sanjeev Setia
Joint Volgenau School/CS Seminar: Performance Engineering in Secure Distributed Systems
Friday at 3:00 PM, November 14, 2008, Johnson Center, Gold Room (Lower Level)
Sanjeev Setia, Associate Professor
Computer Science Department, George Mason University
Joint CS/GRAND Seminar: Computer Science and Video Games: Teaching and Research in Higher Education
Thursday at Noon, November 13, 2008, ST 2 Building, Room 430A
Graham Morgan, Visiting Professor
Computer Science Department, George Mason University
Information Security & Assurance Association Meeting
Tuesday, October 28, 6 PM, SUB I, Room C
Presentations include: ISACA-NCAC and Securing Wireless with WPA
RSVP at: gmu.isaa.rsvp@gmail.com with subject: RSVP for 10/28 GMU-ISAA meeting
SANG Seminar: A First Step Toward Live Botmaster Traceback
Friday 3:00-4:30 PM, October 17, 2008, ST2, 430
Xinyuan Wang, Assistant Professor,
Computer Science Department, George Mason Univerisity
GRAND Seminar: Geometric Algorithms for Biological Research: Everything is a Puzzle After All
Thursday Noon, October 16, 2008, ST2, 430
Amarda Shehu, Assistant Professor,
Computer Science Department, George Mason University
CS Seminar: RISE Tool: A leveraging tool for competitive performance
Wednesday 1:00PM, October 15, 2008, ST2, 430
K. B. Akhilesh, Professor,
Department of Management Studies,
Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India
PhD Defense: A Multi-channel Defense Against Communication Denial-of-Service Attacks in Wireless Networks
Wednesday 10:00AM, October 8, 2008, STII Room 430A
Ghada Matooq Alnifie
Director: Prof. Robert Simon
Joint GRAND/SANG Seminar: Self Cleansing Intrusion Tolerance – Next Generation Server Security
Thursday Noon, October 2, 2008, ST2, 430
Arun Sood, Professor,
Computer Science Department,
George Mason University
GRAND Seminar: Experimental Results on Alternative Strategies in Two Agent-Based Game Playing Systems
Thursday Noon, September 25, 2008, ST2, 430
Andrés Gómez de Silva Garza, Professor,
Computer Engineering Department,
Mexican Autonomous Technology Institute (ITAM)
System and Networking Seminar: Clone Attack and Insider Attack Detection in Wireless Sensor Networks
Friday 3:00PM, September 12, 2008, STII, Room 430A
Xiuzhen Cheng, Associate Professor,
Computer Science Department,
George Washington University
CS/GRAND Seminar: Automated Annotation of Drosophila Gene Expression Patterns Using a Controlled Vocabulary
Thursday 11:00AM , September 11, 2008, STII Room 330A
Jieping Ye, Assistant Professor,
Computer Science and Engineering Department,
Arizona State University
PhD Defense: Towards Lower Bounds on Distortion in Information Hiding
Thursday 11:00AM, September 11, 2008, STII Room 430A
Younhee Kim
Co-Directors: Prof. Zoran Duric & Prof. Dana Richards
Software Engineering Seminar: Testing Model Transformations in a MDE Context
Tuesday 12:00Noon-1:00PM, September 02, 2008, STII, Room 430A
Benoit Baudry, Researcher,
INRIA, France

Summer 2008

PhD Defense: Query Consolidation: Interpreting Queries Sent to Independent Heterogeneous Databases
Wednesday 1PM, July 23, 2008, STII Room 430A
Aybar C. Acar
Advisor: Dr. Amihai Motro
Software Engineering Seminar: On the Problem of Optimal Service Selection for Service Oriented Architectures
Wednesday 11:00AM, July 23, 2008, STII, Room 430A
Daniel Menasce, Professor,
Computer Science Department,
George Mason University
Software Engineering Seminar: Testing Calculation Engines using Input Space Partitioning and Automation
Wednesday 9:30AM-11:00AM, July 16, 2008, STII, Room 430A
Chandra Alluri, Graduate Student,
Computer Science Department,
George Mason University
CS Faculty Recruitment Seminar: Accountable Anonymity
Tuesday, 11:00AM-12:00Noon, July 8, 2008, ST II, Room 320
Apu Kapadia, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow
Institute for Security Technology Studies
Dartmouth College
CS Faculty Recruitment Seminar: Toward Software Self-Defense
Tuesday, 10:00AM-11:00AM, July 1, 2008, ST II, Room 430A
Michael Locasto, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow
Institute for Security Technology Studies
‚Dartmouth College
Software Engineering Seminar: User Guidance of Resource-Adaptive Systems
Thursday 1:00PM, June 19, 2008, STII, Room 430A
Joao Pedro Sousa, Assistant Professor,
Computer Science Department,
George Mason University
Software Engineering Seminar: Improving the Security of Mobile-Phone Access to Remote Personal Computers
Thursday 1:00PM, June 19, 2008, STII, Room 430A
Alireza P. Sabzevar, PhD Student,
Computer Science Department,
George Mason University
Software Engineering Seminar: Logic Mutation Testing of Software Programs
Thursday 1:00PM, June 12, 2008, STII, Room 430A
Gary Kaminski, PhD Student
Computer Science Department
ˆGeorge Mason University
CS Seminar: Data Mining for the Analysis and Modeling of Eco-Climatic Data
Wednesday 11:00AM-Noon, June 11, 2008, STII Room 430A
Pang-Ning Tan, Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science and Engineering
Michigan State University

Spring 2008

CS/GRAND Seminar: When computers look at art: Image analysis in humanistic studies of the visual arts
Monday 12:00 Noon, May 05, 2008, Jonhson Center, Gold Room
David G. Stork, Chief Scientist,
Ricoh Innovations and Stanford University
GRAND Seminar: What Is Real Motion And Would We Know If We Saw It
Tuesday 12:00 Noon, April 29, 2008, STII, Room 430A
Alexander Razzook, Project Engineer
Physical Disabilities Branch
Rehabilitation Medicine Department
The National Institutes of Health
Naomi Lynn Gerber, Professor
Director, Center for Study of Chronic Illness and Disability
George Mason University
Software Engineering Seminar: Software Self-Adaptation: A study of the field
Monday 1:00PM, April 28, 2008, STII, Room 430A
Nikolaos Abatzis, Master Student
Computer Science Department
George Mason University
Software Engineering Seminar: A Survey of Trust Management Systems
Monday 1:00PM, April 28, 2008, STII, Room 430A
Dalal Al-Arayed, PhD Student
Computer Science Department
George Mason University
Software Engineering Seminar: An Industrial Case Study of Bypass Testing on Web Applications
Monday 1:00PM, April 21, 2008, STII, Room 430A
Jeff Offutt, Professor
Computer Science Department
George Mason University
System and Networking Seminar: Roving Bugnet: Distributed Surveillance Threat and Mitigation
Friday 3:00PM, April 18, 2008, STII, Room 430A
Ryan Farley, Ph.D. Student
Computer Science Department
George Mason University
GRAND Seminar: Visualizing & Exploring Networks using Semantic Substrates
Tuesday 12:00 Noon, April 15, 2008, STII, Room 430A
Aleks Aris, PhD Candidate in Computer Science
Human-Computer Interaction Lab
University of Maryland, College Park
GRAND Seminar: Deriving structural properties of the rat hippocampus: A computational approach
Tuesday 12:00 Noon, April 08, 2008, STII, Room 430A
Deepak Ropireddy
Krasnow Institute
George Mason University
System and Networking Seminar: Routing in Delay Tolerant Networks
Friday 3:00PM, April 04, 2008, STII, Room 430A
Muhammad Abdulla, Ph.D. Candidate
Computer Science Department
George Mason University
CS Faculty Recruitment Seminar: Detecting Functional Modules in Heterogeneous Biological Data
Thursday, 11:00AM-12:00Noon, April 03, 2008, Johnson Center, Gold Room
Alexander Schliep, PhD
Department of Computational Molecular Biology
Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biology
GRAND Seminar: Heuristic Search And Information Visualization Methods For School Redistricting
Tuesday 12:00 Noon, April 01, 2008, STII, Room 430A
Marie desJardins, Associate Professor
Computer Science and Electrical Engineering
University of Maryland, Baltimore County
CS Faculty Recruitment Seminar: Molecules in Motion: Computing Structural Flexibility
Thursday, 11:00AM-12:00Noon, March 27, 2008, Research I, Room 163
Amarda Shehu, PhD Candidate
Department of Computer Science
Rice University
CS Faculty Recruitment Seminar: Multiscale Modeling of Calcium Dynamics in Ventricular Myocytes: from Imaging to Simulation
Monday, 11:00AM-12:00Noon, March 24, 2008, Research I, Room 163
Zeyun Yu, Postdoctoral Fellow,
Department of Mathematics
University of California San Diego
System and Networking Seminar: SQLProb: A Proxy-based Architecture towards Preventing SQL Injection Attacks
Friday 3:00PM, March 21, 2008, STII, Room 430A
Anyi Liu, Ph.D. student
Computer Science Department
George Mason University
CS Faculty Recruitment Seminar: Structure and Function of Proteins Using Computational Methods
Thursday, 11:00AM-12:00Noon, March 20, 2008, Research I, Room 163
Huzefa Rangwala, PhD Candidate
Department of Computer Science
University of Minnesota
CS Faculty Recruitment Seminar: Darshak: A Planning System for Cinematic Visual Discourse Generation in Virtual Environments
Tuesday, 11:00AM-12:00Noon, March 18, 2008, Research I, Room 163
Arnav Harish Jhala, PhD Candidate
Department of Computer Science
North Carolina State University
CS Faculty Recruitment Seminar: The Road to Human-Level AI in Wargames: Algorithms for Implementing the Five Canonical Offensive Maneuvers in a CGF Environment and Making Tactical Decisions Drawing Upon Knowledge Acquired from a Dataset of Historical Battles
Monday, 11:00AM-12:00Noon, March 17, 2008, Johnson Center, Gold Room
David Ezra Sidran, PhD Candidate
Department of Computer Science
University of Iowa
System and Networking Seminar: Secure Structures for Symmetric Key Ciphers and Their Applications
Friday 4:00-5:30PM, March 07, 2008, STII, Room 430A
Debra Cook, Ph.D., Researcher
Alcatel-Lucent Bell Labs
CS Faculty Recruitment Seminar: Interdisciplinary Visualization and Interactive Computin
Thursday, 10:30-11:30AM, March 06, 2008, Johnson Center, Gold Room
Daniel Keefe, Postdoctoral Research Associate
Visualization Research Lab
Brown University
CS Faculty Recruitment Seminar: Interpersonal Simulation
Tuesday, 11:00Am-Noon, March 04, 2008, SUBII, Ballroom Front
Kyle Johnsen, Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Computer and Information Science and Engineering
University of Florida
System and Networking Seminar: Exploiting Hardware/Software Interactions for Embedded Systems Design
Friday 1:30-3:00PM, February 22, 2008, STII, Room 430A
Sibin Mohan, Ph.D. Candidate
Computer Science Department
North Carolina State University
Joint ECE/CS Seminar: On the Use of Source Coding as a Tool for Network Protocols Design and Evaluation
Wednesday 11:00AM-Noon, February 20, 2008, SUBII Room 5&6
Alhussein Abouzeid, Associate Professor
Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
GRAND Seminar: Probabilistic Topic Modeling for Text Data
Tuesday 12:00 Noon, February 12, 2008, STII, Room 430A
Loulwah AlSumait, Ph.D. student
Department of Computer Science
George Mason University
PhD Defense: Service Assurance in Insecure Networks with Byzantine Adversaries
Monday 10AM, February 11, 2008, STII Room 430A
Paul Rabinovich
Advisor: Dr. Robert Simon
CS Seminar: VoIP over 802.11
Thursday 2:00-3:30PM, February 07, 2008, SUBII Room 5&6
Henning Schulzrinne, Professor and Chair
Department of Computer Science
Columbia University
System and Networking Seminar: Dynamic Bi-Overlay Rotation for Streaming with Heterogeneous Devices
Friday 3:00PM, January 25, 2008, STII, Room 430A
Dongyu Liu, Ph.D. student
Computer Science Department
George Mason University
GRAND Seminar: Two New Methods for Predicting Outcome in Cancer Patients
Tuesday 12:00 Noon, January 22, 2008, STII, Room 430A
Dechang Chen, Associate Professor
Department of Preventive Medicine and Biometrics
The Uniformed Services University of the Health Science

Fall 2007

GRAND Seminar: Machine learning techniques in image analysis of Bio-Structures
Thursday Noon, December 06, 2007, STII Room 430A
Ajay Nagarajan, Ph.D. student
Computer Science Department
George Mason University
CS/ISE Seminar: The Wireless Networks Program at the National Science Foundation
Thursday 10:30AM-12:00Noon, December 06, 2007, STII Room 430A
Jie Wu, Program Director
CISE/CNS/NeTS
National Science Foundation
System and Networking Seminar: Scaling Properties of Worst-Case Delays in Networks
Friday 3PM, November 30, 2007, STII Room 430A
Florin Ciucu, Postdoctoral Fellow
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
University of Toronto
GRAND Seminar: Serious Games and Robotics in Command and Control: Kinetics meets Information
Thursday Noon, November 29, 2007, STII Room 430A
Jay Crossler, Ph.D. student
George Mason University
CS/ISE Seminar: Biclustering Bioinformatic Data Sets Using a Possibilistic Approach
Wednesday 2PM, November 28, 2007, STII Room 430A
Francesco Masulli, Associate Professor
University of Genova, Italy
CS/ISE Seminar: Satisfying Complex Data Needs using Pull-Based Online Monitoring of Volatile Data Sources
Tuesday 11AM, November 27, 2007, STII Room 430A
Avigdor Gal, Associate Professor
Israel Institute of Technology
PhD Defense: Reliable Bulk Data Dissemination in Sensor Networks
Monday 11AM, November 26, 2007, STII Room 430A
Leijun Huang
Advisor: Dr. Sanjeev Setia
GRAND/SANR Seminar: Online Buffer Management
Thursday Noon, November 8, 2007, STII Room 430A
Fei Li, Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science
George Mason University
CS/ISE Seminar: Machine Learning with Adaptive Data Transformation
Tuesday 1:30PM, November 6, 2007, SUBII Room 6-7
Carlotta Domeniconi, Assistant Professor
Department of Information and Software Engineering
George Mason University
CS/ISE Seminar: Healthcare Informatics: The Subject, the Challenges, the Opportunities
Friday 2PM, November 2, 2007, STII Room 430A
Khalid Moidu, Professor
Farokh Alemi, Professor
College of Health & Human Services
George Mason University
System and Networking Seminar: OpenTor: Anonymity as a Commodity Service
Friday 3PM, October 26, 2007, STII Room 430A
Angelos Stavrou, Assistant Professor
George Mason University
GRAND Seminar: Flexible Metrics in Machine Learning
Thursday Noon, October 25, 2007, STII Room 430A
Carlotta Domeniconi, Assistant Professor
Information and Software Engineering Department
George Mason University
GRAND Seminar: Multi-Robot Simultaneous Localization and Mapping
Thursday Noon, October 18, 2007, STII Room 430A
Keith Sullivan, Ph.D. Student
Computer Science Department
George Mason University
CS/ISE Seminar: Critical Infrastructure Protection: The Research Challenge in Europe
Wednesday 11AM, October 17, 2007, STII Room 320
Emiliano Casalicchio, Associate Professor
Computer Science, Systems and Production Department
University of Roma "Tor Vergata", Italy
CS Seminar: The Future of Internet Security
Friday Noon-1PM, October 12, 2007, Johnson Center Room E
Steven M. Bellovin, Professor
Computer Science Department
Columbia University
GRAND Seminar: Static and Motion Based Approaches to Biometric Gait Recognition
Thursday Noon, October 11, 2007, STII Room 430A
Ed Lawson, Ph.D. Student
George Mason University
GRAND Seminar: Minimizing Distortion in Information Hiding
Thursday Noon, October 4, 2007, STII Room 430A
Younhee Kim, Ph.D. Candidate
George Mason University
System and Networking Seminar: Billing Attacks on SIP-Based VoIP Systems
Friday 3PM, September 28, 2007, STII Room 430A
Xinyuan Wang, Assistant Professor
George Mason University
GRAND Seminar: Kernel and Spectral Methods for Clustering
Thursday Noon, September 27, 2007, STII Room 430A
Maurizio Filippone, Ph.D. Student
Department of Computer and Information Sciences
University of Genova, Italy

System and Networking Seminar: Intrusion Detection on Rootkit
Friday 3PM, September 14, 2007, STII Room 320
Jing Jin
George Mason University
GRAND Seminar: Discovering Unusual Patterns in Massive Time Series Data
Thursday Noon, September 13, 2007, STII Room 430A
Jessica Lin, Assistant Professor
George Mason University
GRAND Seminar: Probabilistic Motion Planning Methods and Their Applications
Thursday Noon, September 6, 2007, STII Room 430A
Jyh-Ming Lien, Assistant Professor
George Mason University
System and Networking Seminar: Enabling "Out-of-the-Box" Malware Detection with Virtual Machines
Friday 3PM, August 31, 2007, STII Room 320
Xuxian Jiang, Assistant Professor
George Mason University

Summer 2007

PhD Defense: Securing Public and IP Telephone Networks
Wednesday 10:00AM, July 25, 2007, Research I Room 401
Hemant Sengar
Advisor: Dr. Sushil Jajodia and Dr. Duminda Wijesekera
PhD Defense: Deducing Fatigue and Cognitive Engagement from Eye Region Biometrics
Tuesday 10:30AM, July 17, 2007, STII Room 430A
Ricci L. Heishman
Advisor: Dr. Zoran Duric and Dr. Duminda Wijesekera
ISE/C4I Seminar: Information Fusion from Databases, Sensors and Simulations - A Research Initiative for a Common Approach
Friday 11AM-Noon, June 15, 2007, Research I Room 163
Gunnar Mathiason (University of Skövde) and Per Gustavsson (SAAB, University of Skövde)

May 2007

PhD Defense: An Analysis of Island Models in Evolutionary Computation
Friday 1:00PM, May 11, 2007, STII Room 430
Zbigniew Skolicki
Advisor: Dr. Kenneth De Jong
CS/ISE Seminar: Scenarios Read by People and Software
Friday 11AM-Noon, May 11, 2007, Research I Room 163
Thomas Alspaugh, Assistant Professor
Department of Informatics
University of California Irvine

April 2007

PhD Defense: Coupling-based Analysis of Object-Oriented Software
Monday 1:00PM, April 30, 2007, STII Room 330B
Aynur Abdurazik
Advisor: Dr. Jefferson Offutt
CS/ISE Seminar: Secure Two-Party Computation in Two Rounds
Monday 11AM-Noon, April 23, 2007, Research I Room 163
David Omer Horvitz, Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Computer Science
University of Maryland, College Park
CS/ISE Seminar: Trends in the Game and Film Entertainment Industry
Thursday 10:30AM-11:30AM, April 12, 2007, STII Room 430
Bing McCoy,
Stone Foundation Entertainment
CS/ISE Seminar: An Overlay Architecture for End-to-End Service Availability
Monday 10AM-11AM, April 9, 2007, Research I, Room 163
Angelos Stavrou, Ph.D. Candidate
Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science
Columbia University
CS/ISE Seminar: Community Discovery and Analysis in Biological Networks
Thursday 11AM-Noon, April 5, 2007, Research I Room 163
Jianhua Ruan, Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Computer Science and Engineering
Washington University in St. Louis
CS/ISE Seminar: Co-evolution (Correlated Mutations) as An Indicator of Protein and Domain Interactions
Tuesday 10AM-11AM, April 3, 2007, Research I Room 163
Raja Jothi, Ph.D.
National Institutes of Health(NIH)
National Center for Biotechnology Information, Bethesda, MD
CS/ISE Seminar: Optimal K-mer Superstrings for Protein Identification and DNA Assay Design
Monday 10AM-11AM, April 2, 2007, Research I Room 163
Nathan Edwards, Ph.D.
Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology
University of Maryland, College Park

March 2007

CS/ISE Seminar: Circuit Lower Bounds
Thursday 10:30AM-11:30AM, March 29, 2007, Research I, Room 163
Rahul Santhanam, Postdoctoral Researcher
Department of Computer Science
University of Toronto
CS/ISE Seminar: Online Buffer Management in QoS Switches
Tuesday 10AM-11AM, March 27, 2007, Research I Room 163
Fei Li, Ph.D. Candidate
Computer Science Department
Columbia University
CS/ISE Seminar: Reductions for Comparing Access Control Models
Monday 10AM-11AM, March 26, 2007, Research I, Room 163
Mahesh V. Tripunitara, Ph.D.
Motorola Labs
CS/ISE Seminar: Accounting for Context and Lifetime Factors: A New Approach for Evaluating Regression Testing Techniques
Friday 10AM-11AM, March 23, 2007, Research I, Room 163
Hyunsook Do, Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Computer Science
University of Nebraska, Lincoln
CS/ISE Seminar: Succinct Data Structures: External and Dynamic
Tuesday 11AM-Noon, March 20, 2007, Research I, Room 163
Rahul Shah, Research Assistant Professor
Computer Science Department
Purdue University
CS/ISE Seminar: Detecting and Tracking Inconsistencies in Software Design Models
Monday 11AM-Noon, March 19, 2007, Research I, Room 163
Alexander Egyed, Ph.D.
Teknowledge Corporation
University of Southern California
CS/ISE Seminar: A User-Centric Approach for Improving a Distributed Software System's Deployment Architecture
Wednesday 1PM-2PM, March 7, 2007, SUBII Ballroom(Front)
Sam Malek, Ph.D. Candidate
Computer Science Department
University of Southern California
Bioinformatics Seminar: Multi- and Large-Scale Systems Modeling and Analysis: Cellular Metabolic Dynamics in Tissue-Organ and Whole-Body Systems
Friday 11AM, March 2, 2007, Verizon Auditorium, Occoquan Building, Prince Williams Campus
Gerald M. Saidel
Professor, Department of Biomedical Engineering
Director, Center for Modeling Integrated Metabolic Systems
Case Western Reserve University

February 2007

Seminar: Providing Assurance of the Correctness of Security-critical Code: Two Approaches Based on Formal Methods
Tuesday 11:00AM-Noon, February 20, 2007, Research I Room 401
Elizabeth I. Leonard, Ph.D.
Myla Archer, Ph.D.
Center for High Assurance Computer Systems
Naval Research Laboratory
IT & E Seminar: Computational Hemodynamics for the Evaluation and Treatment of Brain Aneurysms
Friday 11:00AM, February 16, 2007, STII Room 320
Juan Cebral, Associate Professor
Department of Computational and Data Sciences
College of Science
George Mason University
PhD Defense: Workload Characterization and Business-Oriented Performance Improvement Techniques for Online Auction Sites
Monday 1:00PM, February 12, 2007, STII Room 430A
Vasudeva Akula
Advisor: Dr. Daniel Menascé

January 2007

IT & E Seminar: Mining Gene Expression Data for the Presence of Genetic Variation
Tuesday 11:00AM, January 23, 2007, STII Room 320
Jennifer Weller, Associate Professor
Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology
School of Computational Sciences
George Mason University

December 2006

Joint C4I/CS/ISE Seminar: Adaptive Service-Oriented Application Architecture and System Engineering
Friday 2:00PM, December 8, 2006, STII Room 320
Raymond Paul
Technical Director for Command and Control (C2) Policy
Office of the Secretary of Defense
Networked Information Infrastructure
PhD Defense: Learning From Data Streams Using Transductive Inference and Martingale
Wednesday 9:30AM, December 6, 2006, STII Room 430
Shen-Shyang Ho
Advisor: Dr. Harry Wechsler
Joint C4I/CS/ISE Seminar: RFID in the U.S. Department of Defense
Tuesday 2:00PM, December 5, 2006, STII Room 320
Nick Tsougas, Director
RFID programs
SRA International
PhD Defense: An Analysis of Two-Population Co-evolutionary Computation
Friday 2:00PM, December 1, 2006, STII Room 430
Elena Popovici
Advisor: Dr. Kenneth DeJong

November 2006

IT & E Seminar: Simulation and Virtual Reality for Education and Medical Applications
Tuesday 1:30PM, November 21, 2006, SUBI Room A
Jim X. Chen, Associate Professor
Department of Computer Science
George Mason University
Seminar: Using Honeyclients for Detection and Response Against New Attacks
Thursday 11:00AM-Noon, November 16, 2006, Research I Room 401
Kathy Wang
The MITRE Corporation
Joint CS/ISE Seminar: Some Recent Advances in Near-neighbor Statistical Learning
Monday 2:00PM, November 6, 2006, STII Room 330B
Maya Gupta, Assistant Professor
Department of Electrical Engineering
University of Washington
PhD Defense: An Integrated Approach to Rule Refinement for Instructable Knowledge-Based Agents
Monday 10:30AM, November 6, 2006, Research I Room 401
Cristina Boicu
Advisor: Dr. Gheorghe Tecuci

October 2006

Joint CS/ISE Seminar: Low-Power Real-Time Computing
Tuesday 2:00PM-3:00PM, October 31, 2006, SUBII Room 3014, Meeting Room 3
Hakan Aydin, Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science
George Mason University
Krasnow Monday Seminar: Very Large Scale Agent Systems and Emergent Macroeconomics
Monday 4:00PM, October 30, 2006, Krasnow Institute Building Room 229
Robert Axtell,
Center for Social Complexity, Krasnow Institute, George Mason Univ
Sante Fe Institute, and Brookings Institution
Joint CS/ISE Seminar: Near Duplicate Document Detection
Thursday 3:00PM, October 19, 2006, STII Room 430
Abdur Chowdhury
http://www.ir.iit.edu/~abdur/
Seminar: Malicious Transactions in Mobile Database Systems
Wednesday 11:00AM-Noon, October 18, 2006, Research I Room 401
Vijay Kumar, Professor
Computer Science & Informatics
University of Missouri-Kansas City
PhD Defense: Secure Real-Time Service Protocols in the DOD Environment
Tuesday 10:00AM-Noon, October 17, 2006, STII Room 330B
Barry P. Sweeney
Advisor: Dr. Duminda Wijesekera
Seminar: Research Issues of Privacy Access Control Enforcement Model for Mobile Ad Hoc Healthcare Services
Thursday 11:00AM-Noon, October 12, 2006, Research I Room 401
Patrick C. K. Hung, Assistant Professor
Business and Information Technology
University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), Canada
ECE Seminar: QoS-Driven Cross-Layer Optimized Resource Allocation Over Wireless Networks
Wednesday 1:30-2:30PM, October 11, 2006, SUBII Room 7
Xi Zhang, Assistant Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Texas A&M University

September 2006

Seminar: VR for Training and Gaming:Can We Fly for Real?
Wednesday 10:00AM, September 27, 2006, STII Room 430
Kai-Uwe Doerr
University of California, Irvine
California Institute for Telecommunication and Information Technology
Joint CS/ISE Seminar: Extracting Topics from Web Archives: Stochastic k-Means Analysis
Tuesday 11:00AM-Noon, September 26, 2006, STII Room 430
Hiromichi Fujisawa
Stanford University
Hitachi Research Labs, Tokyo, Japan
Seminar: Exploiting Open Functionality in SMS-Capable Cellular Networks
Monday 2:00-3:00PM, September 25, 2006, Research I Room 401
Patrick McDaniel, Assistant Professor
Department of Computer Science and Engineering
Pennsylvania State University
Joint CS/ISE Seminar: Steering Behaviors for Autonomous Vehicles in Virtual Environments
Tuesday 10:30AM, September 12, 2006, STII Room 430
Joseph Kearney, Professor
Department of Computer Science
University of Iowa
PhD Defense: Protecting Privacy in Released Database Views
Tuesday 11:00AM, September 5, 2006, STII Room 320
Chao Yao
Advisor: Dr. Sushil Jajodia and Dr. X. Sean Wang

Summer 2006

PhD Defense: The Analysis and Design of Concurrent Learning Algorithms for Cooperative Multiagent Systems
Thursday 10:30AM, August 31, 2006, STII Room 320
Liviu Panait
Advisor: Dr. Sean Luke
PhD Defense: Sampling Based Methods for Robust Motion Estimation and Image Based Localization
Monday 11:00AM, August 28, 2006, STII Room 430
Wei Zhang
Advisor: Dr. Jana Košecká
Graduate Orientation
Wednesday 6:00PM, August 23, 2006, Innovation Hall
Undergraduate Orientation
Monday 1:45PM & 6:30PM, August 21, 2006, STII Room 430
PhD Defense: Denial-of-Service Resistant Quality-of-Service Provisioning for Mobile Ad hoc Networks
Monday 2:00PM, July 31, 2006, STII 320
Marek Hejmo
Advisor: Dr. Brian Mark
Seminar: SHAGE : A Self-Managed Software Framework for Service Robots
Wednesday 3:00PM, July 12, 2006, STII Room 330B
Sooyong Park, Professor
Department of Computer Science
Sogang University, Korea
PhD Defense: Enhanced Unified Modeling Language Model-Checking for Business Software Applications
Monday 1:00PM, July 10, 2006, STII Room 430
John C. Zubeck
Advisor: Dr. David Rine

2005–2006 Academic Year

Approximation Techniques in Geometric Computing
Monday 9:00-10:30 AM, April 3rd, 2006, ST2 rm 320
Jyh-Ming Lien, Faculty Candidate
Computer Science Department
Texas A&M University
Virtual Backbone in Wireless Networks: Algorithms and Analysis
Tuesday 10:00-11:30 AM, March 28th, 2006, ST2 rm 320
My Thai, Faculty Candidate
Department of Computer Science and Engineering
University of Minesota
Parallel Methods in Computational Genomics
Monday 9:00-10:30 AM, March 27th, 2006, ST2 rm 320
Anantharaman Kalyanaraman, Faculty Candidate
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Iowa State University
Grid Computing
Wednesday 11:00 AM, September 28, 2005, ST2 rm 430a
Mark Pullen, Professor
Computer Science Department
George Mason University
E-terrorism: The powerful weapon of Islamic Jihad
Wednesday 12-1:30 PM, August 31st, 2005, Mason Hall, D-3
Dr. Gianpietro Mazzoleni
Visiting Scholar from the University of Milan
Professor of Sociology and Communication

2004–2005 Academic Year

Building Trust in Computing
Wednesday 11:00AM, May 17, 2005, ST2 rm 430a
Glenn Schoonover CISSP MCSE Security Solutions Specialist
Microsoft Federal
Washington, D.C.
Nonoextensive Statitical Mechanics - Introdution and Recent Results
Thursday 11:00AM, January 27, 2005, ST2 rm 430a:
Constantino Tsallis, Santa Fe Institute New Mexico
Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
PRAM on a chip
Wednesday 11:00AM, December 8th, 2004, ST2 rm 430a:
Uzi Vishkin, University of Maryland
Learning to Detect Malicious Executables
Wednesday 11:00AM, November 10th, 2004, ST2 rm 430a:
Mark Maloof, CS Department, Georgetown University
DAIRS: Distributed Agents for Information Retrieval
Wednesday 11:00AM, October 27th, 2004, ST2 rm 430a
Arun Sood, Chairman
Department of Computer Science
George Mason University
Describing and Understanding Human body Motions: The Liguistic Postures and Gestures
Wednesday 11:30AM, October 27th, 2004, ST2 rm 430a (following Prof. Sood's talk above)
Zoran Durić
Dept. of Computer Science
George Mason University

2003–2004 Academic Year

2002–2003 Academic Year

  • 11:45 AM, February 12, 2003, ST2 rm 430: 1. Harry Wechsler, FACE RECOGNITION
    2. Zoran Durić, UNDERSTANDING HUMAN MOVEMENT
  • 11:45 AM, March 5 2003, ST2 rm 430: James Chen, REAL-TIME SIMULATION AND DISTRIBUTED VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENT FOR LEARNING
  • 11:45 AM, March 19, 2003,ST2 rm 430: Daniel Menasce, SOFTWARE, PERFORMANCE OR ENGINEERING?
  • 11:45 AM, April 2, 2003,ST2 rm 430: 1. Robert Simon, MOBILE AND WIRELESS NETWORKS
    2. Sanjeev Setia, SECURING WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS

  • 11:45 AM, April 16, 2003,ST2 rm 430: Amitabh Varshney, University of Maryland and UMIACS, POINT BASED RENDERING AND SUBSURFACE SCATTERING