Nature

Nature is the international weekly journal of science: a magazine style journal that publishes full-length research papers in all disciplines of science, as well as News and Views, reviews, news, features, commentaries, web focuses and more, covering all branches of science and how science impacts upon all aspects of society and life.
  • Al Gore’s dream spacecraft is ready to fly
    [Jan 2015]

    Al Gore’s dream spacecraft is ready to fly

    Nature 517, 7534 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/517256a

    Author: Mark Zastrow

    After almost 14 years in mothballs, DSCOVR probe will monitor conditions on Earth and in space.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Microbiology: Here's looking at you, squid
    [Jan 2015]

    Microbiology: Here's looking at you, squid

    Nature 517, 7534 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/517262a

    Author: Ed Yong

    Margaret McFall-Ngai has dissected the relationship between a beautiful squid and its live-in bacteria — and found lessons for microbiome research on the way.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Neurodegeneration: Cold shock protects the brain
    [Jan 2015]

    Neurodegeneration: Cold shock protects the brain

    Nature 518, 7538 (2015). doi:10.1038/nature14195

    Authors: Graham Knott

    A protein released during hypothermia has been found to affect the progression of neurodegenerative disease in mice by sparing neurons from death and preserving the connections between them. See Letter p.236

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • RBM3 mediates structural plasticity and protective effects of cooling in neurodegeneration
    [Jan 2015]

    RBM3 mediates structural plasticity and protective effects of cooling in neurodegeneration

    Nature 518, 7538 (2015). doi:10.1038/nature14142

    Authors: Diego Peretti, Amandine Bastide, Helois Radford, Nicholas Verity, Colin Molloy, Maria Guerra Martin, Julie A. Moreno, Joern R. Steinert, Tim Smith, David Dinsdale, Anne E. Willis & Giovanna R. Mallucci

    In the healthy adult brain synapses are continuously remodelled through a process of elimination and formation known as structural plasticity. Reduction in synapse number is a consistent early feature of neurodegenerative diseases, suggesting deficient compensatory mechanisms. Although much is known about toxic processes leading to synaptic dysfunction and loss in these disorders, how synaptic regeneration is affected is unknown. In hibernating mammals, cooling induces loss of synaptic contacts, which are reformed on rewarming, a form of structural plasticity. We have found that similar changes occur in artificially cooled laboratory rodents. Cooling and hibernation also induce a number of cold-shock proteins in the brain, including the RNA binding protein, RBM3 (ref. 6). The relationship of such proteins to structural plasticity is unknown. Here we show that synapse regeneration is impaired in mouse models of neurodegenerative disease, in association with the failure to induce RBM3. In both prion-infected and 5XFAD (Alzheimer-type) mice, the capacity to regenerate synapses after cooling declined in parallel with the loss of induction of RBM3. Enhanced expression of RBM3 in the hippocampus prevented this deficit and restored the capacity for synapse reassembly after cooling. RBM3 overexpression, achieved either by boosting endogenous levels through hypothermia before the loss of the RBM3 response or by lentiviral delivery, resulted in sustained synaptic protection in 5XFAD mice and throughout the course of prion disease, preventing behavioural deficits and neuronal loss and significantly prolonging survival. In contrast, knockdown of RBM3 exacerbated synapse loss in both models and accelerated disease and prevented the neuroprotective effects of cooling. Thus, deficient synapse regeneration, mediated at least in part by failure of the RBM3 stress response, contributes to synapse loss throughout the course of neurodegenerative disease. The data support enhancing cold-shock pathways as potential protective therapies in neurodegenerative disorders.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Deep mysteries
    [Jan 2015]

    Deep mysteries

    Nature 517, 7534 (2015). doi:10.1038/517244a

    Arguments among ocean scientists show how much remains to be discovered.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Out of the bag
    [Jan 2015]

    Out of the bag

    Nature 517, 7534 (2015). doi:10.1038/517244b

    The preference for either cats or dogs affects science more than you might think.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Animal behaviour: Monkey in the mirror
    [Jan 2015]

    Animal behaviour: Monkey in the mirror

    Nature 517, 7534 (2015). doi:10.1038/517246a

    Macaques can be trained to recognize themselves in a mirror, the first such observation in any monkey species.Most animals encountering their reflections act as if they are seeing another creature. To find out whether monkeys can be trained to recognize their own reflections, Neng

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Microbiology: Gut microbes' survival tactics
    [Jan 2015]

    Microbiology: Gut microbes' survival tactics

    Nature 517, 7534 (2015). doi:10.1038/517246b

    Gut bacteria protect themselves from host inflammation by modifying their outer membranes.Immune responses designed to wipe out infection could, in theory, also perturb helpful flora that reside in the gut. To find out how these microbes resist the effects of inflammation, Andrew Goodman of

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Materials: Arsenic forms a semiconductor
    [Jan 2015]

    Materials: Arsenic forms a semiconductor

    Nature 517, 7534 (2015). doi:10.1038/517246c

    Single-atom-thick layers of arsenic and antimony could be efficient semiconductors that have more applications than other two-dimensional materials.Atom-thick materials can have unique electronic and optical properties, but some operate only at certain wavelengths of light, owing to small 'band gaps'. On the basis of

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Evolution: Lungs began with many chambers
    [Jan 2015]

    Evolution: Lungs began with many chambers

    Nature 517, 7534 (2015). doi:10.1038/517246d

    The lungs of ancestral, land-based vertebrates may have had multiple chambers rather than just one, as was believed.Markus Lambertz at the University of Bonn in Germany and his colleagues studied lung samples from 73 species of amniotes, which include mammals, birds and reptiles. They

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Sustainability: Resource use peaks worldwide
    [Jan 2015]

    Sustainability: Resource use peaks worldwide

    Nature 517, 7534 (2015). doi:10.1038/517246e

    The rates at which humans consume multiple resources such as food and wood peaked at roughly the same time, around 2006. This means that resources could be simultaneously depleted, so achieving sustainability might be more challenging than was thought.Ralf Seppelt of the Helmholtz Centre

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Materials: Silicon buckles to form 3D shapes
    [Jan 2015]

    Materials: Silicon buckles to form 3D shapes

    Nature 517, 7534 (2015). doi:10.1038/517247a

    Researchers have created a variety of small, three-dimensional structures by buckling strips of silicon and other materials.Turning advanced two-dimensional materials into three-dimensional shapes has proved difficult. John Rogers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and his colleagues added hydroxyl groups at specific locations

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Evolution: Mosquitoes gain resistance
    [Jan 2015]

    Evolution: Mosquitoes gain resistance

    Nature 517, 7534 (2015). doi:10.1038/517247b

    A malaria-carrying mosquito inherited insecticide-resistance genes from a related species, around the time that bed nets treated with insecticide were increasingly used in West Africa.Gregory Lanzaro at the University of California, Davis, and his colleagues analysed DNA from more than 1,000 specimens of Anopheles

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Photonics: Few photons make 'ghost image'
    [Jan 2015]

    Photonics: Few photons make 'ghost image'

    Nature 517, 7534 (2015). doi:10.1038/517247c

    Physicists have captured an image of a wasp's wing using less than one photon per pixel.Peter Morris and his colleagues at the University of Glasgow, UK, used a technique called ghost imaging, which uses pairs of photons whose positions are inextricably correlated, or entangled.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Plant genetics: Maize's journey out of Mexico
    [Jan 2015]

    Plant genetics: Maize's journey out of Mexico

    Nature 517, 7534 (2015). doi:10.1038/517247d

    DNA from the cobs of ancient maize (corn) shows how the crop was taken to the US southwest from Mexico.Maize was domesticated from the wild grass teosinte, an inedible weed, more than 6,000 years ago in southern Mexico, and later spread throughout the Americas.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Seven days: 9–15 January 2015
    [Jan 2015]

    Seven days: 9–15 January 2015

    Nature 517, 7534 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/517248a

    The week in science: Trove of extinct animal bones found in underwater cave; influential leader of German science policy dies; and Japan approves massive stimulus package.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • ‘I can haz genomes’: cats claw their way into genetics
    [Jan 2015]

    ‘I can haz genomes’: cats claw their way into genetics

    Nature 517, 7534 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/517252a

    Author: Ewen Callaway

    Canine dominance bows to tabby chic as cat sequencing takes off.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Tropical paradise inspires virtual ecology lab
    [Jan 2015]

    Tropical paradise inspires virtual ecology lab

    Nature 517, 7534 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/517255a

    Author: Daniel Cressey

    Digital version of Moorea will provide a way to experiment with an entire ecosystem.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Agriculture: State-of-the-art soil
    [Jan 2015]

    Agriculture: State-of-the-art soil

    Nature 517, 7534 (2015). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/517258a

    Author: Rachel Cernansky

    A charcoal-rich product called biochar could boost agricultural yields and control pollution. Scientists are putting the trendy substance to the test.

    Categories: Journal Articles
  • Human adaptation: Manage climate-induced resettlement
    [Jan 2015]

    Human adaptation: Manage climate-induced resettlement

    Nature 517, 7534 (2015). doi:10.1038/517265a

    Authors: David López-Carr & Jessica Marter-Kenyon

    Governments need research and guidelines to help them to move towns and villages threatened by global warming, argue David López-Carr and Jessica Marter-Kenyon.

    Categories: Journal Articles